Uganda has been in the news for its plan to pass legislation that defines homosexual behavior as warranting long terms of imprisonment. The legislation originally planned would have included death sentences, and despite claims that is being removed, it is not clear that will be the case. The legislation is so absurd it would include provisions that would allow a male even touching another male accidentally in a way interpreted as a sexual advance to be subject to the law.

Amnesty International, famous for its work and efforts worldwide for freedom and tolerance, fails miserable in its statement on the Uganda legislation.

Email to Amnesty International contact address from their web site:

Your statement on Uganda is reported to include the following:

“It goes against the principle of privacy of individuals. And sexual orientation is really a question of the right of an individual to choose how they want to live their lives.”

I am not at all sure what universe or century you are living in, but let me point out to you that at this point science a and psychology and sociology have clearly demonstrated that being gay or transgender is NOT A CHOICE. It is a manifestation of the inborn nature of an individual expressing itself.

Your statement is not only not helpful, it is reactionary and backward. What, are you now going to support the totally discredited ‘cure the gay’ or ‘pray the gay away’ movements? Because, as you say, it is just a choice.

I do not know who at Amnesty International is responsible for this, but fix it. Fix it now. I have always supported your organization, but not after something as pathetic as this.

From CNN’s coverage, quoting Amnesty International.

Although Amnesty International has been informed that some provisions of the bill have been amended, the content of these amendments have not been made publicly available.

“This bill violates the principle of nondiscrimination as guaranteed under international and regional treaties to which Uganda is a party.”

“We are outraged,” said Noel Kututwa, the rights group’s director for southern Africa. “This goes beyond the principle of nondiscrimination. It goes against the principle of privacy of individuals. And sexual orientation is really a question of the right of an individual to choose how they want to live their lives.

Uganda lawmakers to vote on anti-gay law